CDCR Report Shows Continued Drop in California Recidivism Rate


(09/14/2016)
The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) released a report on Aug. 25 showing the rate at which offenders return to state prisons is continuing to fall. The department’s annual recidivism report, The Outcome Evaluation Report, shows the total three-year return-to-prison rate for all offenders released during fiscal year 2010-2011 is 44.6 percent. This marks a nearly 10 percent decrease from the 54.3 percent recorded last year, according to a department statement.
 

Project to Watch: East County Detention Center

By Jessie Fetterling
(09/12/2016)
Construction is fully underway on the East County Detention Center in Indio after breaking ground in May 2015. The 1,626-bed facility will include 1,273 new beds as well as 353 replacement beds when it is completed in 2018.
 

Q&A: Trends in Green Design

By Lindsey Coulter
(09/12/2016)
Today’s commercial market offers a wide variety of green and sustainable products with the demonstrated ability to help facilities of all types save money, energy and maintenance. These environmentally friendly systems, materials and initiatives have long since become a staple in correctional and justice projects, from new construction to renovation and expansion. While many justice and correctional facilities have embraced a variety of green technologies, some once heralded as significant energy- and resource-saving breakthroughs are already falling to the wayside.
 

Women Now Being Incarcerated at Higher Rate Than Men, Study Shows


(08/23/2016)
More and more women are being held in local jails, and the disadvantages which in many cases contributed to their incarceration — such as trauma, behavioral and physical health needs, single-parenthood and poverty — are often exacerbated while in custody, according to a new report released Aug. 17 from the Washington-based Vera Institute of Justice.
 

Justice Department to End Use of Private Prisons

By Jessie Fetterling
(08/23/2016)
Deputy Attorney General Sally Q. Yates instructed in a memo last week for Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) officials to either decline to renew the contracts for private prison operators when they expire or substantially reduce the contracts scope, according to The Washington Post. The ultimate goal is to end the use of privately operated prisons, she wrote.