California Improves Realignment Funding Formula


(09/24/2014)
Changes to California’s prison realignment funding formula based on poverty rates and the effects of state prisons on the counties in which they are located will result in correctional funding boosts for several counties. These funds will provide more support for jails and probation programs, and could be used to increase beds or expand efforts to end recidivism.

Greene County Jail Begins Accepting Inmates

By Jessie Fetterling
(09/24/2014)
The first phase of the $16.5 expansion project at the Greene County Detention Center was officially completed and began accepting inmates last month, about five months after the jail held its official ribbon-cutting ceremony. Although the construction has been behind schedule, the facility was built under budget, according to project manager Dave Tierney.

Florida Gets Tough on Inmate Abuse


(09/17/2014)
More than a dozen employees of the Florida Department of Corrections have been fired following a crack down on employee misconduct. The department announced 13 officers, sergeants and other prison staff have been dismissed for separate incidents of inmate abuse at the Lancaster Correctional Institution in Trenton and the Northwest Florida Reception Center in Chipley. Two additional offers were dismissed for driving under the influence and driving with a suspended license.

Senators Urge BOP to Start Danbury Project


(09/17/2014)
The Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) is under public scrutiny after delaying the construction of a new prison for women in Danbury. U.S. senators from the Northeast urged the BOP in a letter to get the project back on schedule so women in the Danbury prison complex can be close to their children, as well as have the opportunity to participate in drug rehabilitation and job training programs.

Oregon Prison Study Shows Racial Disparities


(09/03/2014)
A new study released by Oregon State University (OSU) shows Hispanics are disproportionately represented in private prisons across the United States, while white inmates are underrepresented, a pattern which could leave private correctional facilities vulnerable to legal challenges.

Stanislaus County Begins Largest Capital Project

By Jessie Fetterling
(09/03/2014)
A groundbreaking ceremony was held on Aug. 15 for the $113 million expansion to the Public Safety Center in Ceres, located outside of Modesto. It is the largest capital project launched by the Stanislaus County government.

Kitchen Upgrades Improve Wilmington Institution’s Dining Process

By Jessie Fetterling
(08/27/2014)
The Delaware Department of Correction unveiled the new 32,000-square-foot kitchen at Howard R. Young Correctional Institution in Wilmington earlier this month. While the kitchen still requires some last-minute touches and health-code approvals, it will be ready to cook the approximately 5,100 meals a day required by the institution in the next month or two.

CEA, JPay Join Forces for Education Initiative


(08/27/2014)
A recent partnership between the Correctional Education Association (CEA), based in Elkridge, Md., and correctional services firm JPay of Miami stands to significantly increase education opportunities for both adult and juvenile inmates, while at the same time easing the strain on the county’s prison system.

Utah Tackles Recidivism Rates, Prison Growth


(08/20/2014)
Utah recently became the 25th state to embark on a corrections and sentencing reform campaign aimed improving rehabilitation and reducing recidivism and prison construction. Governor Gary Herbert announced the state’s Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice (CCJJ) will continue work with The Pew Charitable Trusts to increase public safety and limit expected growth in the state’s prison budget.

California Inmates Sue State Over Valley Fever, Again


(08/20/2014)
A lawsuit was filed in federal court in Sacramento on July 14 against the state of California on behalf of 58 current and former inmates who contracted Valley fever while serving time in one of the state’s Central Valley prisons. The lawsuit accuses the state of knowing for years that the incurable disease was being spread throughout Central Valley prisons, but did nothing to address the problem, reported The Sacramento Bee.